Stalled Freilite Brevis S: <5L Gaming Case with internal PSU

Discussion in 'Custom Cases & Projects' started by iFreilicht, May 28, 2015.

  1. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    Not really an update, but I started working on the project again. If you aren't interested in technical stuff about the case, you can safely ignore this. ;)

    Mostly clean-up work, restructuring of the cad model, but I also wanted to ensure that this case is going to last.
    So instead of having tapped threads for all the screws, I will use self-clinching nuts, specifically Penns F4 Series. Very durable, very space efficient.
    Using these nuts instead of deeper ones is required to comply with the ATX standard in terms of distance from the mainboards conducting components, and I think they look a lot nicer than protruding nuts.
    This means that the main mounting panels now need to be 1.5mm thick instead of 1mm, but I don't see that as a disadvantage yet.

    I also decided to scale the motherboard screws up from M3 to M4 to have more surface area available for the motherboard to rest on, both on the standoffs and the screwheads. I know this is a bit unconventional, but with M3, the standoffs are extremely narrow, and this case is supposed to be put in backpacks and take a bit of a beating, so I don't want to take any risks.

    Two decisions are coming up that I'm a bit undecided about:

    1. Should the currently blank "bottom panel" get intake vents for the PSU, just like the top panel has them? It would greatly increase the amount of airflow available to the PSU, especially when it has a lot of cabling to deal with. On the other hand, that could really hurt the aesthetics for some people, I kind of like having one completely plain panel.

    2. Should the HDD mount be made thicker by 0.5mm as well? It doesn't really need to be that thick in terms of stability and it will give the HDDs less room to vibrate, but it would allow me to use ISO-standardised countersunk M2.5 screws, because their head is 1.5mm tall. There are screws that can be countersunk into 1mm thin sheets, but those are really hard to come by and that may hurt users that lose screws. I could also make the case another Millimetre taller to compensate for the additional height.
     
    Phuncz likes this.
  2. Aibohphobia

    Aibohphobia aka James
    Chimera Industries

    I think a blank panel would look nicer too but it's hard to say if the extra venting is necessary without actually testing it.

    I'm running into the same issue with the countersunk metric screws, they don't seem to come in anything shallower than 90°. I don't recall, are you using steel or aluminum? 1.5mm steel is fairly heavy.
     
  3. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    Yeah I suppose I'll just have to test it.

    I use aluminium all around, so I'm not too concerned about the additional weight. LianLi makes their own countersunk M3 screws that can be sunk into sheet metal as thin as 1mm, maybe even 0.8mm and you can buy from them directly. I did the same thing with their 6mm long M3 standoffs.
     
  4. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic SFF Guru
    Moderator LOSIAS

    Great job, what a pity that I only discovered it today.

    What is your CAD software ?
     
  5. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    Thank you very much!
    There's still a lot to be done, so you're not missing anything really :D

    I use Autodesk Inventor 2016 because that's what I occasionally get to work with at work, but I'm not sure whether I'd recommend it over any other product.
     
  6. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic SFF Guru
    Moderator LOSIAS

    That's already too much missed :D. I know the feeling of what's left to be done, but you move faster than me lol.

    This looked very Autodesk like, but I was not sure. I'm using Sketchup but it's pretty limited and I make it crash quite often. I have not a lot of experience with CAD tools, just a little with Autocad back in the late 90's at school. I'm used to 3DS and Maya as I have a degree in 3D modeling / animation but it's not very suited with product conception.

    Ideally, I'm after an free CAD software that is cross-platform ... if it is open source then it'd be like heaven :D.
     
  7. jØrd

    jØrd SCSI for life
    Moderator Gold Supporter Supporter of Efficiency LOSIAS Digital Seppuku

  8. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic SFF Guru
    Moderator LOSIAS

  9. EdZ

    EdZ Virtual Realist
    Gold Supporter

    Onshape is worth a look if you want something more CAD oriented then Blender. Performs surprisingly well for something web-based.
     
  10. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic SFF Guru
    Moderator LOSIAS

    Nice tool, and since it's web based it is indeed cross-platform. I'll give it a try.
     
  11. Aibohphobia

    Aibohphobia aka James
    Chimera Industries

  12. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic SFF Guru
    Moderator LOSIAS

    FreeCAD looks great, definitely worth as try.
     
  13. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    Don't want to interrupt your CAD talk, but I've finally got a chance to test the LiHeat A type riser today that they've sent to me a few weeks ago. Not anything to report really, everything worked just like I didn't use the riser, no matter how I bent or flexed it, and it will fit inside the case just how I planned it to. What a boring update.
     
    Phuncz likes this.
  14. Aibohphobia

    Aibohphobia aka James
    Chimera Industries

    Boring is good, means nothing went wrong :p
     
  15. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    True dat.

    I've finally started to talk to some local manufacturers. It's not sure yet whether one of them can do everything I need, but maybe, just maybe, that will be possible. Getting pretty darn excited over here :D
     
    Phuncz likes this.
  16. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    Hey guys, just a quick notice: I am still alive and working on this, but a mayor redesign for the interior is required. A lot of the Z170 boards that have been coming out feature a M.2 slot on the bottom, and I feel like I have to incorporate this fact into the design. Right now the board is directly screwed to the side panel which doesn't allow any access to the back of the board at all, and this has to be changed. Sorry for the lack of updates, I will do my best to work on it as often as I can.
     
    Phuncz likes this.
  17. Phuncz

    Phuncz Lord of the Boards
    Moderator Gold Supporter SFF Purist

    I think it's good you are solving that issue, more and more people are aligning with using an M.2 drive for the OS-drive and mITX Z170 has the M.2 socket on the back of the board, indeed.
     
  18. EdZ

    EdZ Virtual Realist
    Gold Supporter

    Unless by 'directly screwed' you mean 'no standoffs', that only makes it just as (in)convenient to access as every other ITX case available. Which may be acceptable for most if swapping m.2 drives is not a common occurrence.
     
  19. iFreilicht

    iFreilicht FlexATX Authority
    Thread Starter

    I mean standoffs that are pressed into the side panel.

    The problem is that most small ITX cases are very inconvenient to work in, and I want to do it better. I realise that you won't replace that drive very often, but that's the case for almost any component in a PC, but once you do actually want to replace it, you appreciate it has been thought about.

    An additional problem is that some people are concerned about thermals for those SSDs. Tinkering with solutions to move heat from the SSD to the side panel is much more pleasant when you don't have to remove the mainboard every time. Heck, you could even leave the PC running and compare different kinds of conducting material if you like.

    Some people may also have their system on a 2.5" drive right now but want to upgrade later. If there's access to the back of the board, that will be done in no time.
     
  20. EdZ

    EdZ Virtual Realist
    Gold Supporter

    On the other hand, having the solid motherboard tray behind the board makes for a great heatsink for an m.2 drive (couples a drive with a very small thermal load to the chassis temperature) with just a basic thermal pad. If there is a window, then you either need a heatpipe, a copper shim (plus a tensioning mechanism) or an extra airflow route and possibly even extra clearance for a dedicated heatsink.