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Acer Monitor - 'No Signal' Error

MAB941009

Caliper Novice
Original poster
Jul 8, 2019
28
10
Maybe buying a DP-mDP cable to connect to the SP6 as a monitor is a financially better option than buying a VGA monitor. I imgaine, a cheap cheap VGA monitor has to be more expensive than a DP-mDP cable?

Thanks for the tip! tinyitx, you've just saved me from purchasing a Chromecast (but not the secondary monitor, unfortunately). I wasn't aware of the huge difference in capabilities between a Chromecast and a DP adapter until spiralling off into the internet pages after your comment. Of course, the price is also lower. Both the adapter and monitor are stated to arrive tomorrow, so I'll be able to narrow down the problem shortly.
 
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MAB941009

Caliper Novice
Original poster
Jul 8, 2019
28
10
I'd feel bad if you purchased it and it's not the monitor, but if you are buying one anyway, yes, it could at least rule out the display as being the problem. I'm inclined to think it's the motherboard at this stage, unless there's something else we missed. Might be prudent to ask elsewhere as well (Reddit, perhaps) for a second opinion, and if the display turns out to be okay you may have to RMA the mobo.

Did you connect the pc speaker (aka "chassis speaker") to the motherboard? It should be in the motherboard box if you didn't install it, and manual should have a diagram of how to install it. If it beeps, the number of beeps will give a better idea of what's wrong (manual should list the error codes).

It's alright. I have since opted for a mDP-DP over a Chromecast. I'll test the monitor using that adapter - the Chromecast doesn't cooperate with 2k - and I'll connect my PC to the secondary monitor I've ordered for delivery. After those tests, we'll have a clearer understanding over this 'No Signal' problem. The worst-case scenario you've suggested is to replace either the monitor or the motherboard, depending on the culprit, if there is no manual fix.

On the PC Speaker, this particular motherboard doesn't ship with one. (I've double checked my parts, and I've verified with the installation guide.) There is a port for the speaker, but not the component in the box. Currently, the motherboard flashes three lights at the bottom side upon power up (see: ). No error codes are displayed anywhere on conjunction to these lights. Perhaps because the DAN A4 case doesn't ship with/support the LED connector. A second reading of the quick installation guide shows no Dr. Debug codes, either. A look into the full manual online is equally barren. The Phantom Gaming 9 motherboard does have Dr. Debug codes; this ITX variant does not. As a result, I don't know how to troubleshoot this motherboard. I have ordered a PC speaker (it'll arrive on Saturday), but even with audio feedback I wouldn't know how to interpret the signals.

Q: What are all the things required for the PC to boot-up? Thus far I can confirm the PSU, GPU and CPU cooler fans spin. And the motherboard lights up. The CPU and RAM don't have visual indicators as to their status, so I can't reliably communicate their standing.
 
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MAB941009

Caliper Novice
Original poster
Jul 8, 2019
28
10
Update:

Using an mDP-DP adapter by Ugreen, I have established a connection between the Acer monitor and my SP6. This means the problem is seated in my PC configuration, which I shall later take apart and troubleshoot incrementally, from the motherboard in isolation to a full build.

 
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CountNoctua

(no relation)
Jul 11, 2019
214
263
Okay, that's good: we know it's not the monitor.

The main things that can keep the PC from even displaying video output - the ones that you haven't ruled out yet, at least - are motherboard and CPU related. It's also possible both sticks of RAM are bad or that the PSU isn't providing enough power or is damaged in some way (still looks to be providing some power, though), but those are less likely at the moment. You'd have to have a PSU tester or multimeter or spare PSU to rule out the PSU entirely, but given that it's providing some power to the board I rule out the other things first.

It's too bad they didn't include a PC speaker with the motherboard as it's a cheap component, but oh well.
If you have one coming in, once you connect it and you do get beeps you can look them up based on the provider of the UEFI/BIOS, e.g. AMI (it should say somewhere in BIOS who the provider is, but I'm guessing it's AMI based on past ASRock mobos). A quick search of the motherboard doesn't show they list the beep codes in there, which is odd and annoying, but there are websites (like this one) that list what a BIOS provider's codes mean. Beep codes can't diagnose every issue, but it's a very useful tool specifically for situations like this.

Also, a careful rebuild outside of the case (putting mobo on an antistatic mat or the motherboard box) will eliminate shorts from the case as a cause, and if you *carefully* (don't want to bend pins in the process!) remove the CPU from the socket you should check for bent or broken pins, which you'll need to do anyway if it is the motherboard that's bad, as the manufacturer (ASRock) can deny a return if there's physical damage to the board.
 
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MAB941009

Caliper Novice
Original poster
Jul 8, 2019
28
10
Update 2:

https://imgur[DOT]com/a/8KNNYkB

Thanks in large part to @CountNoctua's posts (thank you! ?), I have successfully solved the problem which brought about this thread. The problem was a lack of signal between my newly built PC and my Acer monitor. As this build was my first, I had no reference point for what a finished PC setup looked like, and thus lacked the insight to troubleshoot any errors. I turned to a few forums for advice, but this forum proved the most helpful.

The cause of the problem was... misaligned RAM.

In the past few days, I disassembled the PC to leave the motherboard and PSU operational only. I used a static mat, as per recommended, to add parts one-by-one, to then test the functionality using a PC speaker. After placing the RAM, the speaker gave me three short blurps in response to subsequent power. This error refers to the malalignment of your DIMM sticks. Suspicious, I manually readjusted them and saw the forsaken AsRock logo followed by the illustrious BIOS page.

I patiently set up the PC. What I did next was what all venerable gamers do after completion of their first build: game all night.

Thus, we reach the end of this thread. We conclude on a positive note. I thank everybody who commented on the thread, and I recommend those who might face similar issues the following resources:

General troubleshooting guide:
AMIBIOS beep codes troubleshooting guide:

For those potentially interested in a similar build, for whatever reason, you can see my specifications below. Note the above photo captured a Logitech K120 keyboard, not a Vortex Race 3.


(Wallpaper: Stefano, Evil Within 2)
 
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Choidebu

"Banned"
Aug 16, 2017
1,196
1,196
Someone advised to reseat the ram since like, tuesday lol.

Lesson learned. I love my asus board for its debug leds, no need for speakers. But yeah, they are indispensable everywhere else even if we can't stand it.
 
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MAB941009

Caliper Novice
Original poster
Jul 8, 2019
28
10
That is awesome, glad you got it worked out. Big thumbs up to @CountNoctua for all his advice. :thumb:

It took just under a week, but the effort was worth the reward. Indeed!
Someone advised to reseat the ram since like, tuesday lol.

Lesson learned. I love my asus board for its debug leds, no need for speakers. But yeah, they are indispensable everywhere else even if we can't stand it.

Haha. They did. I had reseated the RAM once before and once after, too. The error was in my understanding of how to seat the RAM; more specifically, the feedback of properly seated RAM. I didn't know they required a click. I kept them loose, a little wobbly, in fear of damaging the pins (which in retrospect aren't really damageable).
 
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lilclie

Caliper Novice
Jul 14, 2019
29
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It took just under a week, but the effort was worth the reward. Indeed!

Haha. They did. I had reseated the RAM once before and once after, too. The error was in my understanding of how to seat the RAM; more specifically, the feedback of properly seated RAM. I didn't know they required a click. I kept them loose, a little wobbly, in fear of damaging the pins (which in retrospect aren't really damageable).
It okay man. It was me on Tuesday lol
 

rfarmer

Shrink Ray Wielder
Jul 7, 2017
2,367
2,439
It took just under a week, but the effort was worth the reward. Indeed!

Haha. They did. I had reseated the RAM once before and once after, too. The error was in my understanding of how to seat the RAM; more specifically, the feedback of properly seated RAM. I didn't know they required a click. I kept them loose, a little wobbly, in fear of damaging the pins (which in retrospect aren't really damageable).
I know the feeling, you want to be careful but sometimes you do have to use some force.
 

MAB941009

Caliper Novice
Original poster
Jul 8, 2019
28
10
It okay man. It was me on Tuesday lol

;D Thanks anyway, @lilclie!

I know the feeling, you want to be careful but sometimes you do have to use some force.

Right, @rfarmer? I think my approach was coloured by the caution advised in a few YouTube PC guides. There were mentions of anti-static equipment and statements such as, "Be very careful to insert your CPU correctly". I was apprehensive to apply force to my RAM as a result. My intuition was restrained by somebody else's advice. I have now, gladly, become familiar with how much force to apply to each part. I think I learnt better through simple trial and error; that is, intent, attempt and reflection, rather than following an expert's instructions. In subsequent builds and possibly unrelated projects, I may try going blind from the start. I have thought to learn a programming language in this way, but ironically the self-learnt style isn't championed in many places, and thus "wouldn't I be wasting so much time?" I remark to myself. I think we often become a perfectionist in this way, because it is so easy to skip ahead to crystallised pieces of knowledge and seasoned experts. What we would fail to understand is these produced guides have arrived at their current states through experience, but most importantly no guide can teach us without first encountering ourselves the relevant problems such guides tried to answer. The main takeaway for me was this continuum of confidence and doubt is mastered primarily through self-experience.
 
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