Power Supply Dual internal Xbox One S PSUs?

Zackmd1

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Why work with the OneS adapter, when you can just try and snag a PS4 Pro PSU? Close to 300W of juice.
https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/PlayStation+4+Pro+Teardown/72946#s147054

That's more power than the two adapters you have there, combined.

I most certainly could. The Xbox one X power supply is rated at 245 watts for example. The reason I tried this approach was due to the size of the units and the flexibility this setup will allow in a small compact case design.
 
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Therandomness

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Capacitors and aluminum fins prevent the height going much lower then 35-37mm. The width and length is determined by the size of the PCB.
I think this is a strange request, but would you mind taking a picture from any of the short sides, looking parallel along the length of the PSU? I want to see if it'll work for something I have planned.
 

Zackmd1

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I think this is a strange request, but would you mind taking a picture from any of the short sides, looking parallel along the length of the PSU? I want to see if it'll work for something I have planned.

Something like this? Let me know if you need any more!









 

Zackmd1

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Ok so some more interesting results.... Swapped power cords, ports on the Y-PWR, and plugged the higher voltage PSU into the kill-a-watt and plugged the second PSU directly into a wall socket. While running the same test as yesterday in Battlefield 1, measured power consumption from the kill-a-watt for the higher voltage PSU was around 110-120 watts. After the competition of this test I then power cycled the PC in order to switch the kill-a-watt to the lower voltage PSU. During start up and normal operation the PSU barely drew 10 watts and at times was at 0. During the same Battlefield 1 gaming session this PSU was only pulling 40-50 watts. So it appears as though the Y-PWR is unevenly loading the higher voltage PSU rather then just switching to one at a time.
 

Zackmd1

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That being said, the uneven loading still did not exceed the max rated power draw of the PSU. The plan forward is to de-solder the stock power leads and replace them with single 14-16 gauge wire (sleeved of course). I plan to make the power leads twice as long and maybe a thinner gauge on the higher voltage PSU in the hopes of bringing the end voltages closer together and to assist in the orientation of the PSUs in the custom case I am designing (had thoughts of going with an s4 mini but decided to go custom instead).
 

Zackmd1

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Aren't they both the same voltage?

One is 11.97 actual voltage while the other is 11.88v. The Y-PWR is suppose to switch load based off of a 100mv difference so I just want to get the 11.97 closer to the 11.88v going into the Y-PWR.
 

Therandomness

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Nov 9, 2016
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Ok so some more interesting results.... Swapped power cords, ports on the Y-PWR, and plugged the higher voltage PSU into the kill-a-watt and plugged the second PSU directly into a wall socket. While running the same test as yesterday in Battlefield 1, measured power consumption from the kill-a-watt for the higher voltage PSU was around 110-120 watts. After the competition of this test I then power cycled the PC in order to switch the kill-a-watt to the lower voltage PSU. During start up and normal operation the PSU barely drew 10 watts and at times was at 0. During the same Battlefield 1 gaming session this PSU was only pulling 40-50 watts. So it appears as though the Y-PWR is unevenly loading the higher voltage PSU rather then just switching to one at a time.
What would the dangers be in just splicing the outputs together?
Also, the images are great for modelling, thanks, but would you mind taking it out of the case and doing similar images?
 

robbee

King of Cable Management
n3rdware
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Sep 24, 2016
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PS: anyone have experience with a 1050ti and 65watt cpu system? Am I close in my assumption that total system power shouldn’t be much more then 140 Watts?

My i3 6100 (51w) + 1050ti draws about 120w from the wall while benchmarking, without voltage tweaking. That's with an AC-DC adapter at supposedly ~90% efficiency.
 
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Zackmd1

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What would the dangers be in just splicing the outputs together?
Also, the images are great for modelling, thanks, but would you mind taking it out of the case and doing similar images?

The issue is that if you directly wire the two together, the higher voltage PSU will start “fighting” with the other producing a lot of heat wasting energy. The Y-PWR is suppose to correct that but so far because of the 100mv difference only one PSU is really getting loaded.
 
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Therandomness

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The issue is that if you directly wire the two together, the higher voltage PSU will start “fighting” with the other producing a lot of heat wasting energy. The Y-PWR is suppose to correct that but so far because of the 100mv difference only one PSU is really getting loaded.
Ah, I see. Well, that’s inconvenient :p Any other workarounds?
 

Zackmd1

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Ah, I see. Well, that’s inconvenient :p Any other workarounds?

Well I am going to continue along with re-doing the power leads to see if the added wire length will have enough resistance to drop that voltage difference some. If that doesn’t work I am seriously considering just going down to a 1050ti and only one PSU.

Again though with all of that said, this combination does work! The higher voltage PSU is only seeing a power draw of 100-110 watts which is below the rated output and well below the 140-150 watts it’s unofficially capable of.
 

Zackmd1

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@Zackmd1, you're tempting me to get one of these PSUs so I can use it for my custom case in a Raven Ridge build. And I already have collected a few AIO PSUs :p

I think it would be a perfect pairing for an APU! I would imagine that system only pulls about 90 watts?
 

CC Ricers

Shrink Ray Wielder
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Nov 1, 2015
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90 to 100 watts, and I think it pulls over 110 if you overclock all the stuff. One question though, is it fairly easy to re-orient the AC socket in that power supply? It may end up sticking out one of the sides if I put one in my case.
 

Zackmd1

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Jun 3, 2016
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90 to 100 watts, and I think it pulls over 110 if you overclock all the stuff. One question though, is it fairly easy to re-orient the AC socket in that power supply? It may end up sticking out one of the sides if I put one in my case.

The AC socket is floating in the housing and connected to the PCB via wiring so it would be very easy to move it!
 
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Zackmd1

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Success! Swapping power leads seems to have had a measurable impact on load sharing! I’m now seeing a much more even sharing of load between PSUs. Same battlefield 1 session is now producing close to a 60/40 split between PSUs with the higher voltage PSU providing around 80 watts while the lower voltage is providing around 60 watts. During some low load situations I am still seeing the lower voltage PSU drop out but during high load I am seeing much more stable load sharing. Heat generation on the higher voltage PSU is down considerably. And again all of this is providing a rock solid power solution to my 1060/Ryzen 1400 rig.
 

Zackmd1

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As previously requested, here are pictures of the PSU with the housing removed.









The new power leads are 14 gauge wire. I have them temporarily connected to 4 pins but plan on getting black 4 pins and some sleeving materials in order to clean up the look.



Another observation is that there is some variability in these power supplies in terms of thermal transfer. The higher voltage PSU got hotter to the touch when under the same load as compared to the second PSU. When I disassembled the PSUs to change the power leads I noticed far more thermal transfer paste on the higher voltage PSU then the lower voltage PSU.