Splicing Sata to PCIE 6 Pin

Biowarejak

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So, I have a couple of these guys:
And I was wondering, is there a way I can splice one of them onto the SATA cable directly by removing the male and female ends? I would also be taking the opportunity to reduce my cable length and sleeve them, so I'm not concerned about soldering and heat shrinking over the joints.
 

zovc

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I'm confused and don't want to take away from you getting help, but I'm interested: what are you trying to accomplish by doing this?
 

Biowarejak

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Thanks @iFreilicht, I'll look into which wires to use then. I was a bit confused because the 6 pin connector has multiple wires that I think stem from a single wire connected to the power supply.

@zovc I'm curious to do this because my power supply does not have a PCIE 6 pin connector natively, and I didn't want the SATA connectors to show in my rig. It's an EVGA 430watt 80+ bronze that I got for cheap, so I don't mind modding it. I'm looking at getting the 1080ti and so I needed the additional connector.
 
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Phuncz

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Mind you that SATA is specced for 1.5A so that's about 18W on 12V. To reach the 75W that a 6-pin PCIe connector is specced for, you'd need atleast 5 SATA connectors and a power supply that's capable of delivering 75W on those. It's an easy way to damage or destroy your PSU, if not set something on fire.

EDIT: 1080Ti ? It needs a 6-pin and an 8-pin, which is 75W+150W. I wouldn't try that on a mediocre PSU that doesn't even have PCIe connectors to begin with.
 

Biowarejak

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It has a 6+2 connector already, and my system load with the 1080ti would still be below the maximum of the power supply. I only have one HDD so I've several unused SATA power connectors.

-Edit-

The point about the specs is noted though. Makes me curious why the adapter was made in the first place.
 

iFreilicht

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Mind you that SATA is specced for 1.5A so that's about 18W on 12V. To reach the 75W that a 6-pin PCIe connector is specced for, you'd need atleast 5 SATA connectors and a power supply that's capable of delivering 75W on those. It's an easy way to damage or destroy your PSU, if not set something on fire.

The wires are probably capable of much more, so soldering them all together isn't really a problem. But yeah, products like that shouldn't really exist.
 

Phuncz

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Yes in my post I was under the assumption the SATA connectors were going to be used. Still, if thinner gauge wires are used on the PSU, it's still a fire-hazard, considering there will be more than 6A running over the single 12V wire.
 
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iFreilicht

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it's still a fire-hazard

I wouldn't necessarily go that far. Even if the PSU supplies all the power it can through a thin wire and blows it up (which is very unlikely to happen, it should shut/break down way before that), I can't see what part of the PC would combust and burn. Except if you're using a wooden case, I guess.
 
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Therandomness

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Nov 9, 2016
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Thanks @iFreilicht, I'll look into which wires to use then. I was a bit confused because the 6 pin connector has multiple wires that I think stem from a single wire connected to the power supply.

@zovc I'm curious to do this because my power supply does not have a PCIE 6 pin connector natively, and I didn't want the SATA connectors to show in my rig. It's an EVGA 430watt 80+ bronze that I got for cheap, so I don't mind modding it. I'm looking at getting the 1080ti and so I needed the additional connector.
Do you actually want a firebomb instead of a PC? Mixing that PSU with a 1080 Ti with cause some lovely fireworks. The PSU is of terrible quality, and if you can afford a 1080 Ti, you'd be much better off getting something like an EVGA G3 550W.
I wouldn't necessarily go that far. Even if the PSU supplies all the power it can through a thin wire and blows it up (which is very unlikely to happen, it should shut/break down way before that), I can't see what part of the PC would combust and burn. Except if you're using a wooden case, I guess.
The actual innards of the PSU can catch fire (which is what will happen).
 

Biowarejak

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This is why I love this community :) there's a saying that someone who asks a question is a fool for five minutes, but someone who doesn't is a fool for life. In this case, I definitely would've been.

I'm definitely in the market for a new PSU it would seem.
 

Biowarejak

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Yes in my post I was under the assumption the SATA connectors were going to be used. Still, if thinner gauge wires are used on the PSU, it's still a fire-hazard, considering there will be more than 6A running over the single 12V wire.

All the wires in this case are 16 gauge, but I'm not sure what that rail is spec'd for.
 

stevey500

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I would suggest looking at what kind of wire they used inside of the Corsair One; they used some surprisingly thin wires in that machine.
 
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Biowarejak

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I believe using multiple thin wires would allow you to distribute the load, but you need adequate cooling for that.
 
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