S4MAX: Brickless S4M w/ 2080ti and R9 3950x - 600w - on water

Curiosity

SFF>Speed
Silver Supporter
Apr 30, 2016
555
600
Finally got the images to load now that the website is more stable!

That must have been mighty satisfying to see how perfect the fit for the backplate and nvme drive were!

As always, I'm watching with anticipation for how this continues to go!
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
Today I have some more plumbing coming up, starting with what will make or break this build: Alphacool’s NexXxos ST30 V.2 140mm, the single cooler for both CPU and GPU.


Inside the box is a well-packed radiator, a manual and a small box with accessories...


...containing three sets of mounting screws, a matching Allen key, and a tool to undo the two low profile G1/4 screw plugs coming with the radiator.


Further, some Koolance NZL-LXG2 low profile rotary fittings, and a non-rotary Alphacool elbow fitting, form part of the plan. The non-rotary is a few mm shorter, key for this build as the height of the cooling package is severely constrained. Hypothesis is that the orientation of the radiator fitting thread may allow rotating a non-rotary fitting into the right direction, using the leeway of the o-ring, to save a little height.


And indeed, it looks like I get a sufficiently tight fit using the simple elbow on the side constrained for height - on the other side I should have enough clearance to use the rotary Koolance fittings.


With a double rotary Bitspower elbow added, the radiator outlet should be in the right place to connect to the pump/reservoir combo...


...the quite recently#released Alphacool Eisstation 40 DC-LT...


...coming with pump mounting screws, matching Allen key, a straight rotary fitting for radiator attachment and yet another screw plug tool.


It will go along with an Alphacool DC-LT 2600 pump (that's the silent one - there is still the beefier 3600 out there in case things require more throughput)...


...that's coming with an additional set of (long) mounting screws and a mounting ring to better distribute pressure on the pump's o-ring.


Together this makes for an incredibly compact package that should just fit behind the radiator!


Mounted pump-down and the reservoir facing up, the central scew plug port makes for a good fill/ vent port.


Next come the Festo NPQH push-in fittings to hook the pump/res/radiator unit up to the 10mm OD cooling loop:


Fitting nicely and where they are supposed to go!


In this arrangement, the cooling pack leaves enough space for a full-size C14 connector (including EMI filter ) to go into the rear of the case - preferable over the C6 I have used in my last build, as when connected to a 110v AC circuit, a C6 would exceed its rating at the 600w the PSU can potentially draw.


The Cryorig XT140 completes the package...


...for a total 43mm build up before modding the fan - I figure I can save another mm by machining pockets into the fan to accommodate for the folding edge profile of the radiator.


That all makes for a pretty much air-tight fit in the case - practically not requiring any fasteners to hold it in place!



to verify the build's key dimensions, I insert the (fried) PSU...


...and the board into the case - seems to pan out!


Next is adding a EK-FC Rotary terminal to the GPU cooler. This will be a temporary solution - it allows for me to close the cooling loop as planned using fittings exiting the card parallel to the PCB plane rather than perpendicular to it. End game will be to use a custom machined part with G1/8 fittings to make space for full height RAM, as currently there appears to be no low-profile RAM available (let me know should you find some... >=3200 Mhz, <= CL14...) allowing to leverage the full potential of the Ryzen 3xxx platform.


Inside the box are the terminal (heavy PTFE coated forged brass - unlike the default terminal, made of acetal), a set of mounting screws, two o-rings and a matching Allen key. Some silicone oil would have been a nice add-on - it's what you'd like to put on the o-rings before mounting them.



It all fits rather nicely and makes the GPU ready for connection to the Festo loop using G1/4 push in rotary terminals...


...that should allow the tubing to be pointed in the right direction.


Time to check how it stacks up - quite literally:


...and as predicted in CAD, the inner radiator port clashes with the GPU cooler. Despite the shorter non-rotary elbow fitting working out, I'm still about 8mm too tall!


In plan view it's all more or less checking out with the GPUs rotary fittings staying well-clear of the low profile ram (you can imagine how a custom port module with smaller G1/8 fittings will allow to use full height memory modules...):


Key challenge, however, is that unfortunately milling into the perspex GPU block cover to provide a pocket for the radiator outlet is not an option. As you might be able to see below, the clash with the elbow fitting is extending beyond the o-ring line of the water block - that's a non-starter.


Conclusion: Custom inlet to the radiator...
 
Last edited:

Curiosity

SFF>Speed
Silver Supporter
Apr 30, 2016
555
600
Fantastic progress, what a wonderfully dense rad unit! For the custom rad inlet are you planning to drill a hole and thread your own g1/4 (g1/8?) Threads?

Is that risstation smaller than the acrylic top they offer? You've made me wonder if I made a mistake getting the acrylictop with my dclt haha.
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
Fantastic progress, what a wonderfully dense rad unit! For the custom rad inlet are you planning to drill a hole and thread your own g1/4 (g1/8?) Threads?

Is that risstation smaller than the acrylic top they offer? You've made me wonder if I made a mistake getting the acrylictop with my dclt haha.
Yeah will have to drill a hole and solder-in a G1/8 fitting... discussed that with a friend recently and it turns out that the has the mother of all metal workshops in his basement. He's currently experimenting with a turning lathe to see how small a custom fitting he can machine from a brass rod...
his kit will also come in handy when machining the acrylic GPU waterblock top and some case parts as they will have to lose quite some material!

re Eisstation: It's a little bit larger than the acrylic top but makes good for it by having an insane number of connection options - somehow fits my build better. But most importantly, it comes with a built-in reservoir and bubble filter promising to address the air bleeding challenge that my build would otherwise have faced. All still to be proven though...
 

Curiosity

SFF>Speed
Silver Supporter
Apr 30, 2016
555
600
Yeah will have to drill a hole and solder-in a G1/8 fitting... discussed that with a friend recently and it turns out that the has the mother of all metal workshops in his basement. He's currently experimenting with a turning lathe to see how small a custom fitting he can machine from a brass rod...
his kit will also come in handy when machining the acrylic GPU waterblock top and some case parts as they will have to lose quite some material!

re Eisstation: It's a little bit larger than the acrylic top but makes good for it by having an insane number of connection options - somehow fits my build better. But most importantly, it comes with a built-in reservoir and bubble filter promising to address the air bleeding challenge that my build would otherwise have faced. All still to be proven though...
I'm jealous, I've got access toa makerspace but that's the limit of my tool access unless I want to buy things. Very lucky to have that friend! Haha.

I see. I'm going to be using a single 149 just like you are, hopefully my build won't be too much of a pain to bleed lol
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

paulesko

Airflow Optimizer
Jul 31, 2019
247
154
One thing. If you happen to try the 3600 rpm version of the pump take in mind that I have found it waaaaay noisier than the 2600 rpm version. Even with matching rpm I don´t know why it makes a hell of a lot of noise. I´ve tried it in a eisbaer so it may be different with the eisstation though. If noise is a thing for you take that in mind.

Great build, I´m enjoying reading it, really. keep going!
 

sancho

Airflow Optimizer
Sep 20, 2019
247
137
I think fittings are not a problem festo has more suitable options, look. Judging by the photo, there will be a pcie connector that has a certain height, also increased heat dissipation for this radiator and a video card that closes 25% of the air flow. It may be worth considering a remote power supply with a PICO PSU at 600w or 450w minimum (this is my advice). The quality of the mechanical part is very different from the electric, the electrician is not your hobby
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

sancho

Airflow Optimizer
Sep 20, 2019
247
137
Yes, and ekwb video card corner fittings have one problem at high temperature, they are at the junction of the corner, let in air and begin to undermine (verified)
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
One thing. If you happen to try the 3600 rpm version of the pump take in mind that I have found it waaaaay noisier than the 2600 rpm version. Even with matching rpm I don´t know why it makes a hell of a lot of noise. I´ve tried it in a eisbaer so it may be different with the eisstation though. If noise is a thing for you take that in mind.

Great build, I´m enjoying reading it, really. keep going!
yeah that's what I have heard - was going to go for the 3600 initially but thought I'd give the 2600 a shot and see whether it copes as I like it silent...
 
Last edited:

sancho

Airflow Optimizer
Sep 20, 2019
247
137
try to rotate the video card 180 degrees. Then part of the plastic can be cut off from the water block and the pci connector will not interfere and the hdmi outputs can be nicely placed on the side of the case
And also turn the radiator with a pump 180 degrees and replace all the fittings with 8 mm and there will be happiness
 
Last edited:

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
try to rotate the video card 180 degrees. Then part of the plastic can be cut off from the water block and the pci connector will not interfere and the hdmi outputs can be nicely placed on the side of the case
And also turn the radiator with a pump 180 degrees and replace all the fittings with 8 mm and there will be happiness
I have been pondering over such alignment (GPU rotated by 180 degree relative to my current layout), and this has indeed been my initial choice. Comparing options, however, I found that it will result in slightly reduced airflow over the fan as the offset between case and GPU board is slightly smaller in my current alignment (that's assuming use of a cable with a low profile left angle PCIe connector such as the "printed" hdplex pcie 3 - a bit short - or ideally the to-come link-up pcie 4 extreme) when compared to the offset generated by even a cut-down GPU terminal. Of course that comes with its own set of challenges and I will indeed need to machine away quite a lot of the acrylic GPU cover (postig a markup soon...). All that said, rotating the GPU might indeed still be on the cards if the PCIe routing becomes too challenging. Working on a mock-up at the moment.
Re video-out: Plan is to use an internal DP blind plug for headless operation (it's what I do with my current s4 mini) and link a single short DP cable to the ITX/TB3's DP-in at the rear to use the mobo's Thunderbolt port to connect optional additional displays - suffices for the application I plan, and with that in mind the current alignment of the ports works out better - otherwise I'd have a DP connector sticking out at the side...
 

sancho

Airflow Optimizer
Sep 20, 2019
247
137
you can use a raiser from 3m that comes with dan a4 it is longer, more stable and it can also be bent
 

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
Small update from the workshop: Am in possession of two beautifully machined G1/8 brass fittings now. The flange is for soldering them to the radiator... 12mm hole diameter. This should resolve the fitting clash!

 

Valantar

SFF Guru
Jan 20, 2018
997
756
Can't believe I haven't found this thread before, subscribed and watching with bated breath. This is incredible. Very excited to see this progress. Massive kudos to the OP for going above and beyond what anyone could expect to be possible.
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
Some more metalwork:

Next thing I need is temporary chipset cooling solution. My ultimate plan is to use heat pipes to connect chipset and VRMs to the case and make it work as a giant heat sink. This will require some CNC machined parts which I'll get made in China and require several weeks lead-in, so the first iteration of the build will need to make do with something more conventional.

Using a $2 northbridge heat sink I found on ebay...



...I get a near-enough match with the space reservation on the board.

There's some work to be done on the mounting holes though: The board has a 54mm spacing, so the plan is to move one of the fasteners 5mm inwards which should be doable with a bit of drilling and and grinding.



This should do the trick!


Not pretty (the heatsink mounting holes in the board do not line up at 45 degrees, hence the rotation), but the heat sink makes firm contact with the chip and stays clear of all other components so technically that's a box ticked.


Of course this still requires a fan from all we know about x570- and transplanting the one that comes with the board's factory cooling solution is rather straight forward as the screws just find their way into the grooves of the heat sink and provide for a tight fit.


WIth that done, I start to mark-up major cuts to the case in preparation for another workshop session. These big cuts will certainly benefit from using proper milling equipment - there is only so-and-so much precision I can get out of a Dremel with a flex disc...


First markup is a cut to the main board tray to resolve a clash with the mother board's i/o cover (resulting from lowering it into the case by 3.5mm - see earlier posts):



These two notches cut into the front frame will allow me to align the radiator flush to the case's bottom panel by making room for the folded metal brackets on the radiator's edge:


And finally I'll need a 20x28mm cut to fit in the Supermicro's C14 plug - it's made for clipping into metal cases so this should be a straighforward transplant.


As the plug will cover the cuts, I can hand-dremel this one without exposing any messy edges...

...looks about right...

...and makes for a tight fit.
In the plastic bag next to it you see a black 12mm momentary button with white status LED (lesson learned from my last build)...


...that should go nicely with the black rear panel...


...and makes for a clean fit in the case's original DC power connector perforation.


From the inside I get a compact fit of the Supermicro's EMI filter, and can use an existing threaded hole in the case to connect a ground wire.

Next up: Preparing that GPU water block for machining...
 
Last edited:

Choidebu

"Banned"
Aug 16, 2017
1,110
1,102
WIth that done, I start to mark-up major cuts to the case in preparation for another workshop session. These big cuts will certainly benefit from using proper milling equipment -
While you're at it I suggest to have the shop add more weld to the standoff's pemserts, recent reports of few of them popping off is concerning.
 
  • Like
Reactions: petricor

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552
While you're at it I suggest to have the shop add more weld to the standoff's pemserts, recent reports of few of them popping off is concerning.
That´s the ones in the S4M? Ouch... will have a close look! Cheers...
 

sancho

Airflow Optimizer
Sep 20, 2019
247
137
Petricor look here
 

petricor

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Original poster
May 12, 2018
130
552