Part Power socket

L0ngben

Minimal Tinkerer
Original poster
New User
Mar 20, 2020
3
0
Hi everyone

I'm currently building a sandwich style SFF pc case. The plan is to have an internal extension cable from the sfx power supply (600W) to the back of the case where a socket is placed. The problem is that the standard C14 socket is too big (mainly too high) to fit with the rest of my design. Hence I've been trying to find a smaller socket, the most promising found so far being the C6 socket. Do you have any other suggestions of power sockets that are smaller than the C14 socket and have a ground pin? I would really appreciate any suggestions or input!
 

L0ngben

Minimal Tinkerer
Original poster
New User
Mar 20, 2020
3
0
Would this product of any help?
Yeah that is really neat. I didn't know you could get that low profile connectors on the power supply end. Unfortunately I think it has the C14 connector on the socket which is too big for me. But I guess I could just cut it at the end and use another socket. Thank you!
 

L0ngben

Minimal Tinkerer
Original poster
New User
Mar 20, 2020
3
0
I`m considering 3pin aviation connectors: XS8 (up to 3A) or GX12 (up to 5A)
These connectors look very promising, thank you for the suggestions! I live in Sweden so and we have 230V so the XS8 connector should work. I have heard one isn't supposed to solder AC connections. Do you happen to know if this is true and how would you connect the wires to something like a XS8 connector if this is the case?
 

Vlad502

Airflow Optimizer
Nov 4, 2017
252
200
IDK such thing, but found good explanation:
The problem I found was that wires tend to break at soldered connections. This is especially problematic with plugs and wires that need to flex with use. It was a real hassle. I think there are two reasons:
  1. The flex stress is high at the surface of the solder joint because it is rigid. To prevent that you need extra support the wire, so it doesn’t flex at the joints, and that doesn’t always work well.
  2. I suspect that the heat of soldering tends to make the copper wire a bit more brittle at the joint.
Once I switched to using in-line crimp and twist-on connections, those problems disappeared, and I have experienced zero problems with connectivity when the connectors are well installed — which means having a proper crimp tool for in-line connections.
 
  • Like
Reactions: L0ngben