Looking for input in cooling and airflow in an Evolv Shift case with dual AIOs.

OldManGrimm

Efficiency Noob
Original poster
Feb 18, 2018
6
6
TLDR: Anyone using a fan arrangement other than intake on bottom, exhaust on top, for the Evolv Shift case with dual AIOs?

Parts list here: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/grimmwrath/saved/#view=bJfzMp .

As anyone that's built in an Evolv Shift knows, the airflow is severely limited, and temps are problematic. I recently upgraded to an MSI GTX 1080 Armor OC card, which I'm cooling with a Corsair H75 attached via an NZXT G12 bracket. I have Noctua 15mm fans as intake on both AIOs (another H75 on my CPU), and the 140mm fan in the top compartment is exhaust (the typical arrangement.)

My concern is that the air that reaches my card is already heated, so the fan on the NZXT bracket is blowing hot air over the VRM and VRAM. I'm wondering if I wouldn't be better having the AIOs intake through the CPU and exhaust through the GPU, then use the 140mm fan up top as intake, to blow some fresh air over the GPU components?

The 1080 doesn't have temp monitoring of individual components, but I suspect some temp issues in the VRAM due to poor overclocking performance, hence my interest in cooler air for the top compartment of the case.

Pic added for clarity:
 
Last edited:

Runamok81

Runner of Moks
Jul 27, 2015
342
383
troywitthoeft.com
I think we need a few images to help visualize this.
Here is carlos diaz evolv shift from PC Part Picker.

Safe to say your layout looks like this, or different? If it doesn't look like this, how is it different?

 

Nanook

King of Cable Management
May 23, 2016
805
792
TLDR: Anyone using a fan arrangement other than intake on bottom, exhaust on top, for the Evolv Shift case with dual AIOs?

Parts list here: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/grimmwrath/saved/#view=bJfzMp .

As anyone that's built in an Evolv Shift knows, the airflow is severely limited, and temps are problematic. I recently upgraded to an MSI GTX 1080 Armor OC card, which I'm cooling with a Corsair H75 attached via an NZXT G12 bracket. I have Noctua 15mm fans as intake on both AIOs (another H75 on my CPU), and the 140mm fan in the top compartment is exhaust (the typical arrangement.)

My concern is that the air that reaches my card is already heated, so the fan on the NZXT bracket is blowing hot air over the VRM and VRAM. I'm wondering if I wouldn't be better having the AIOs intake through the CPU and exhaust through the GPU, then use the 140mm fan up top as intake, to blow some fresh air over the GPU components?

The 1080 doesn't have temp monitoring of individual components, but I suspect some temp issues in the VRAM due to poor overclocking performance, hence my interest in cooler air for the top compartment of the case.

Pic added for clarity:
I’ve tried that before (bottom intake, bottom-front exhaust, top-front intake) and didn’t see any improvements. In fact, it would create a hot chamber in the bottom half of them case. And the top panel will become toasty via passive exhaust.

I’ve tried everything in that case, from custom loop (soft tubing, reservoir via QDC), to air cooled cpu with custom loop gpu, to dual AIO. I found that dual AIO is actually best for this case.
 

Enter Plasma

Caliper Novice
Enter Plasma
Sep 24, 2018
26
55
I have a Shift X, so it's a bit different, but stuff is similarly applicable I think:

- Remove the filters of the front and rear panels
- Get some REALLY good high pressure fans. I personally use Deltas, but if you want something easier to manage and readily available EK Vardars are a great option. Remove any kind of filter or grill you have.
- I personally have top front intake, bottom/front exhaust, bottom exhaust. I've got custom liquid cooling with 240+120 on the bottom.
- If you don't overclock, undervolt. This will lower temperatures all around, and also reduce heat emitted from PSU, GPU VRMs, and MB VRMs

I have manageable temperatures with a 8600k @5ghz (non delidded yet), and a GTX 980 Ti Kingpin with maxed out power limit, which is quite ridiculous in this case - I've seen people giving up with much less beefy systems.
It gets a bit toasty after long gaming sessions and I still have work to do on it to make it better - but nothing goes to temperatures that I'd find worrysome.