• Hey Guest, save 20% on our entire merchandise range during the month of December! Use promo code MAKEITSMOL at Our Merchandise Store!

SFF.Network Logic Supply Launches Industrial Fanless NUC With Latest Intel Dawson Canyon Motherboard

Press release: An article noted as a press release is copied verbatim from the provider, and thus does not represent the thoughts and ideas of SFFNetwork or Minutiae Media.



DECEMBER 05, 2017 (SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT) - For more than 14 years, Logic Supply (www.logicsupply.com) has been developing highly reliable computer hardware for demanding applications. The company pioneered the use of Intel's Next Unit of Computing (NUC) motherboard within industrial PCs, and today has announced their latest fanless NUC, the ML100G-31. This brand new system joins Logic Supply's ML100 Series of fanless NUC computers, and is powered by Intel's new Dawson Canyon motherboard, enabling 7th generation Core processing in a chassis that fits in the palm of your hand.

Read more here.
 

Nightblade

Airflow Optimizer
Nov 29, 2017
283
235
Lame. I can't buy this from their site without purchasing it with ram. Interestingly, removing the quantity of ram(it won't let you put zero) and leaving it blank sets the price at $557. If you remove the power brick too it drops to $535.
 

DarekLogic

Trash Compacter
Logic Supply
Jan 13, 2016
42
105
www.logicsupply.com
Lame. I can't buy this from their site without purchasing it with ram. Interestingly, removing the quantity of ram(it won't let you put zero) and leaving it blank sets the price at $557. If you remove the power brick too it drops to $535.
Hey @Nightblade, Darek here from Logic Supply. Many of our fanless systems aren't available as barebone units because they're not designed to be opened. The thermal junction between the board and enclosure requires a level of precision that would be compromised if the lid were taken off. It may seem counter-intuitive for those of us who like to customize, but for our industrial clients having pre-configured systems that they can simply power on and start to use out of the box is very appealing.
 

Nightblade

Airflow Optimizer
Nov 29, 2017
283
235
Hey @Nightblade, Darek here from Logic Supply. Many of our fanless systems aren't available as barebone units because they're not designed to be opened. The thermal junction between the board and enclosure requires a level of precision that would be compromised if the lid were taken off. It may seem counter-intuitive for those of us who like to customize, but for our industrial clients having pre-configured systems that they can simply power on and start to use out of the box is very appealing.

@DarekLogic I can understand the logic in that, since mainstream users just want a plug and play computer, this would fit the bill. I however, am very controlling when it comes to hardware. Unless it is a specialized hardware, I want to build it from the ground up. That is why I still like barebone machines: I can still build it to my liking with the price point I so choose.

I've had too many bad experiences growing up with computers that have pre-installed software, which is why I stay away from pre-built computers. a fan-less computer may be the holy grail of computers, but if I can't open it up, I'm not going to touch it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Phuncz

Mortis Angelus

Airflow Optimizer
Bronze Supporter
Jun 22, 2017
279
276
@DarekLogic

Quite the accomplishment, but I still think the price is a bit hefty considering the specs. I know. It is the fanless experience one is paying for, but considering it is totally uncustomizable as well, it should be a bit cheaper. Especially considering the CPU. I made a basic config with 128 GB storage and 8 gb RAM with WiFi, and ended up just below 900 dollars.

On the flip-side, it is a NUC, and NUCs are expensive to begin with...

I also dislike the yellow color scheme. Or did I just miss a color-select option somewhere?

Otherwise I really like the machine and the whole concept of fanless, yet usable computers. Fanless used to belong to small, weak ARM and ATOM CPUs. So good job there!
 

Mortis Angelus

Airflow Optimizer
Bronze Supporter
Jun 22, 2017
279
276
@Mortis Angelus NUCs are not expensive if you use the right parts. Though, they are expensive now with the cost of RAM being crazy high.

NUCs and other similar barebones systems are very expensive in terms of cost-to-performance. Of course, it is all a matter of use as well; much like a proper laptop - sure is more expensive than a desktop for performance, but you can't drag a desktop around with you.

But systems like AsRock's H110 DeskMini really makes NUCs an expensive option. Made a system last year with the DeskMini for 400 EUR. Equivalent NUC would have ended me up on 600 EUR at the time.
 

jØrd

S̳C̳S̳I̳ ̳f̳o̳r̳ ̳l̳i̳f̳e̳
Digital Seppuku
SFFn Staff
Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
LOSIAS
Jul 19, 2015
817
1,351
One thing that does come to mind here. Your not just paying for a NUC in a fanless chassis, I'd expect some of what your paying for is the cost of Logic Supply designing, engineering, testing, certifying, etc an industrial spec (is it rated for shocks, dust ingress, extended temperature operation, etc?) system as well. It might seem expensive and you might not be able to tinker with it but your also not the target market for this device. There are people out there who dont make payroll if the computers out on the shop floor arent running, it seems likely that those are the people this device is being pitched at. This isnt the box you buy and stick under the TV in your lounge room to run Kodi on, its the box you buy and stick under the TV in your operations room to run whatever SCADA monitoring dashboard your company has decided to standardise around.

My $0.02
 

DarekLogic

Trash Compacter
Logic Supply
Jan 13, 2016
42
105
www.logicsupply.com
I can understand the logic in that, since mainstream users just want a plug and play computer, this would fit the bill. I however, am very controlling when it comes to hardware. Unless it is a specialized hardware, I want to build it from the ground up. That is why I still like barebone machines: I can still build it to my liking with the price point I so choose.

I've had too many bad experiences growing up with computers that have pre-installed software, which is why I stay away from pre-built computers. a fan-less computer may be the holy grail of computers, but if I can't open it up, I'm not going to touch it.

Totally understand where you're coming from there and definitely appreciate your perspective.

On the flip-side, it is a NUC, and NUCs are expensive to begin with...

This board in particular is pricey because it's brand new.

I also dislike the yellow color scheme. Or did I just miss a color-select option somewhere?

The orange definitely isn't for everyone (the finish makes it look more yellow in the picture than it really is, it's actually closer to my avatar color), but we really like it. We don't offer alternate colors out of the box, but we do offer custom branding services so clients can choose their own colors and add a logo if they wish.

One thing that does come to mind here. Your not just paying for a NUC in a fanless chassis, I'd expect some of what your paying for is the cost of Logic Supply designing, engineering, testing, certifying, etc an industrial spec (is it rated for shocks, dust ingress, extended temperature operation, etc?) system as well. It might seem expensive and you might not be able to tinker with it but your also not the target market for this device. There are people out there who dont make payroll if the computers out on the shop floor arent running, it seems likely that those are the people this device is being pitched at. This isnt the box you buy and stick under the TV in your lounge room to run Kodi on, its the box you buy and stick under the TV in your operations room to run whatever SCADA monitoring dashboard your company has decided to standardise around.

My $0.02
Appreciate this j0rd, you hit the nail on the head with a lot of the points here. The industrial market does demand additional certification and engineering work which, naturally, gets built into system costs. That extra work is necessary to ensure the utmost reliability to prevent hardware downtime. We work with manufacturers who could lose tens of thousands of dollars for every hour a single computer is offline, so that focus on reliability and additional engineering is very valuable to them.

SCADA applications, warehouse management, manufacturing, outdoor digital signage, remote data monitoring, mobile surveillance, those are really the target applications we focus on, and their needs tend to be very different than the average home computer user.

All that said, we sincerely appreciate all the feedback here. Please keep it coming, it doesn't fall on deaf ears.