Prebuilt Laptops powering 1080 & 6700k with 330W bricks?

Zuuk

Average Stuffer
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Apr 17, 2016
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Please enlighten me about laptop power cirquits if you know about them. How is it that high spec laptops are able to power on a GTX 1080 (180W) and a desktop i7 6700K (95W) , maybe a 4K screen and some mechanical and M.2 SSD off of a single 330W brick? --> Clevo P775DM2-G / Clevo P870DM2-G for instance.

Are the power components spread on the actual motherboard kinda like a big Hdplex 250W, and instead of wires the power is ran through traces and stuff?

Only wondering because were so limited in PSU:s for mini-ITX configs. Pico-psu is indeed small and not many wires but I can't pull off even 65W CPU and 1070 with that. Hdplex 250w with a decent brick could in theory power a 65W CPU and a 1080 but it is cumbersome in size comapred to a laptop board.

Gaming laptops are a growing market, and while do really enjoy SFF cases, the thought of an all in one solution is appealing (other than their crazy price tags). Was thinking if I can mimic a laptops powersystem for a SFF.
 

EdZ

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May 11, 2015
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How is it that high spec laptops are able to power on a GTX 1080 (180W) and a desktop i7 6700K (95W) , maybe a 4K screen and some mechanical and M.2 SSD off of a single 330W brick?
Power consumption for the two is below 330W. The 6700k at peak load is about 85W without the IGP in use, and the 1080 averages around 180W, leaving 70W to play with for the rest of the system. Both components can both peak higher, and the power electronics in the laptop itself need to deal with this (the presence of a battery to act as a buffer helps there), as the brick is will generally be unable to tolerate much rapid change in load.

As for how they can do it in such a low volume: integrating the power electronics into a single board with the rest of the components, hence the 'crazy price tag'.
 
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Zuuk

Average Stuffer
Original poster
Apr 17, 2016
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Thanks for the insight, I was on the right path then :)

Waiting for mobo manufacturers to come up with a mini-itx / m-atx board with a similar integrated components and a simple power plug in the back for an AC-DC adapter like the dell 330W or Voodoo 350W. One can hope right...

Too bad the Clevo barebones are hard to come by in such a configuration where you could add your own cpu, ram, ssd's etc.
Most are pre-configured and way over the top in specs (1080 SLI with dual bricks & adapter etc.)

I've grown to like these behemoths that look aesthetically like they are from the old ages of laptops, true dinosaurs :)
 

Phuncz

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May 9, 2015
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Both components can both peak higher, and the power electronics in the laptop itself need to deal with this (the presence of a battery to act as a buffer helps there), as the brick is will generally be unable to tolerate much rapid change in load.
Now that you mention this, a capacitor or two could maybe fix the issues some people have/had with certain GPUs that were unstable with DC-DC boards.
Would a battery be used in this scenario ? I thought these couldn't be charged and discharged at the same time.
 

Josh | NFC

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Jun 12, 2015
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Power consumption for the two is below 330W. The 6700k at peak load is about 85W without the IGP in use, and the 1080 averages around 180W, leaving 70W to play with for the rest of the system. Both components can both peak higher, and the power electronics in the laptop itself need to deal with this (the presence of a battery to act as a buffer helps there), as the brick is will generally be unable to tolerate much rapid change in load.

As for how they can do it in such a low volume: integrating the power electronics into a single board with the rest of the components, hence the 'crazy price tag'.

My 1080 system with a 6700K maxed out at 270w. (for anyone who was interested)
 

iFreilicht

FlexATX Authority
Feb 28, 2015
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Something like this?: Gigabyte MDQ17BI

Wow, nice find!

Only issue with that is there isn't a good way to get additional power to the PCIE slots, making it usable only for low power systems. It's definitely an elegant solution for a 1050TI system, though.

Do the serial ports bug anyone else? XD

Are you sure about that? The DC input on the back is a 4pin DIN connector, so you can put quite a bit of power through there. And there is a 4pin MiniFit Jr. socket right next to it, which is called "Power Connector" in the datasheet, so I would assume it feeds through directly.

Yeah it's a bummer the I/O is wasted on a serial and a VGA port, but it has a few redeeming qualities like double NICs and even LVDS, so it's a very interesting board for quite a few different applications.
 

Kmpkt

Innovation through Miniaturization
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Feb 1, 2016
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That's a pretty nice little board. The 4 pin onboard power would work perfectly with an HDPlex 160 AC-DC and would run a 1050ti based system without issue.
 

zhl146

SFF Lingo Aficionado
Jul 14, 2016
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Wow, nice find!



Are you sure about that? The DC input on the back is a 4pin DIN connector, so you can put quite a bit of power through there. And there is a 4pin MiniFit Jr. socket right next to it, which is called "Power Connector" in the datasheet, so I would assume it feeds through directly.

Yeah it's a bummer the I/O is wasted on a serial and a VGA port, but it has a few redeeming qualities like double NICs and even LVDS, so it's a very interesting board for quite a few different applications.

Oh, I missed that power connector! Yeah, that would be a pretty awesome then.

For the industrial market this is aimed at it makes sense, RS-232 is still really common on industrial machines.

Yeah, I know. I'm just selfish for my own niche uses :)