Help with first ever SFF Build, NCase M1 V6 Air-cooled

lawtsai

Efficiency Noob
Original poster
Sep 3, 2019
5
0
Hi all,

Long time lurker who finally decided to pull the trigger on ordering one of the new V6 M1s.
I've done a fair amount of research but wanted to see if there were any discrepancies or issues that any of the veteran Ncase builders may notice with my components.

The initial goal of this build was to create a small 4k gaming machine that will be hooked up to 4K TVs. I used the excuse of my son being born to convince my wife to allow me to build a new pc in his name ;). Absolute silence is not necessary with the build but having cool-enough temperatures is a priority.

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor - Unsure if I'm planning to OC yet, but having the option is nice.
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9S 46.44 CFM CPU Cooler - I've been bouncing back and forth between air cooling and attempting to do a full custom water cooling loop. The latter seemed like too much of a hassle for a beginner like me (having to both learn to build in a SFF AND learn water cooling for the first time). From research it seems like the U9S is the most friendly cooler out there.
Motherboard: Any X570 board for future proofing. Between the Gigabyte or ASRock
Memory: Team Dark Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory - extra RAM given to me by my brother
Storage: Any 1 or 2 TB M.2 SSD, I figured for just gaming purposes there was no need for a SATA SSD if I could get away with just a M.2
Video Card: RTX 2080 ti - I've searched and saw that someone was able to fit a 3 slot EVGA 2080ti XC card ( ). My question here is that do you guys think it is worth I cough up the additional $$ for a 2080 ti vs. just purchasing a 2070, 2080 super, etc? My biggest concern would be getting rid of the heat generated by a card as beastly as the 2080ti.
Power Supply: Corsair SF 600 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply


With regards to fans, I am thinking of placing:
- an additional 92 mm Noctua fan on the rear of the case for exhaust
- 1x A12x25 on the front-side panel as intake
- 2x Slim A12x15 fans on the bottom of the case as intake, blowing against the GPU

Any input you guys may have would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
 

CudB

Efficiency Noob
Sep 3, 2019
6
4
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor - Unsure if I'm planning to OC yet, but having the option is nice.
3000 series hasn't been overclocking too well just so you know. It might be worth considering the 3600 instead since 4k gaming performance differences between the two are negligible.

CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9S 46.44 CFM CPU Cooler - I've been bouncing back and forth between air cooling and attempting to do a full custom water cooling loop. The latter seemed like too much of a hassle for a beginner like me (having to both learn to build in a SFF AND learn water cooling for the first time). From research it seems like the U9S is the most friendly cooler out there.
U9S is the least fussy to install, but it's cooling performance is significantly less than a C14S or 240mm AIO cooler. A 240mm AIO is by far the best when comparing these three.

My question here is that do you guys think it is worth I cough up the additional $$ for a 2080 ti vs. just purchasing a 2070, 2080 super, etc? My biggest concern would be getting rid of the heat generated by a card as beastly as the 2080ti.
4K gaming is where you would definitely see the benefit of more GPU power. A 2080ti would never fit in my budget, but it's up to you. Cooling it effectively is usually done with a third party heatsink (Accelero III is popular) and two 120mm Noctua A12x25 fans. Alternatively, you can just remove the stock shroud and fans and just get the Noctua fans.

You will greatly benefit from a custom fan curve and undervolting the GPU since the 2080ti runs hot.

With regards to fans, I am thinking of placing:
- 2x Slim A12x15 fans on the bottom of the case as intake, blowing against the GPU
The two bottom fans can cause turbulence if you're keeping the stock fans on your GPU. Better solution above.
 
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lawtsai

Efficiency Noob
Original poster
Sep 3, 2019
5
0
Thanks for your quick reply! I read that there are some compatibility issues with the 2080TI and the accelero III. My initial plan was to do what you suggested but the fear of taking apart and modifying a 1K+ GPU and possibly ruining it was too frightening. I looked at the EVGA XC / Ultra since it seemed to get better thermals than other cards.
 

titan253

Efficiency Noob
Sep 3, 2019
7
6
CudB pretty much nailed it, save some money on the CPU as a 3600 will not be a bottleneck at 4k and put the savings into the ti, especially if you're only running at 60hz (even at 144hz a 3600 shouldn't slow you down).

Can't comment on the U9S but I put on the C14S on my 3600 and in an open air setup i'm seeing ~50C under gaming loads running the fan at 900 RPM (60%). Running Prime95 SmallFFT for an hour averaged temps 75/76C @ 1200 RPM (80% ) and avg. 3.9 GHZ but did hit 4.19 GHz (SMT & PBO enabled) vs. the stock cooler avg. 95C @ 2500 RPM (100%) throttling to 3.7/3.8 GHz. The stock cooler held similar gaming temps but had to do so at 80-100% fan speed so it was pretty audible but otherwise kept the CPU from throttling. There's not much to learn with an AIO since it saves you from running any tubes, if you can install and air cooler you can install an AIO no problem. Since noise isn't as much of an concern in your situation the Kraken X52 240m AIO fits well on the side mount in the v6 and it'll keep the CPU real cool.

Undervolting the 2080ti will keep temps in check and will be worth tweaking in order to have the extra horsepower since you are 4k gaming. However, unless you have a BFGD running high refresh rates, you'll likely be able to run 4k @ 60hz with a 2070 Super and put the savings into an AIO.
 

CudB

Efficiency Noob
Sep 3, 2019
6
4
Thanks for your quick reply! I read that there are some compatibility issues with the 2080TI and the accelero III. My initial plan was to do what you suggested but the fear of taking apart and modifying a 1K+ GPU and possibly ruining it was too frightening. I looked at the EVGA XC / Ultra since it seemed to get better thermals than other cards.
Yeah you could certainly try running one stock especially since the V6 side panel is much more generous with ventilation.
 

HyperActive

Trash Compacter
Jul 22, 2019
36
11
3000 series hasn't been overclocking too well just so you know. It might be worth considering the 3600 instead since 4k gaming performance differences between the two are negligible.



U9S is the least fussy to install, but it's cooling performance is significantly less than a C14S or 240mm AIO cooler. A 240mm AIO is by far the best when comparing these three.



4K gaming is where you would definitely see the benefit of more GPU power. A 2080ti would never fit in my budget, but it's up to you. Cooling it effectively is usually done with a third party heatsink (Accelero III is popular) and two 120mm Noctua A12x25 fans. Alternatively, you can just remove the stock shroud and fans and just get the Noctua fans.

You will greatly benefit from a custom fan curve and undervolting the GPU since the 2080ti runs hot.



The two bottom fans can cause turbulence if you're keeping the stock fans on your GPU. Better solution above.
This comment nailed it all! Furthermore, optimumtech and 1 other guy have posted video's on the best fan set up.

Slim fans won't do much and with the new ventilation holes, maybe the 2080ti van handle it. Undervolting is the way to go, or go with a waterblock one.
 

lawtsai

Efficiency Noob
Original poster
Sep 3, 2019
5
0
Thank you guys for the input!

As an alternative to the u9s, a friend recommended I try to get ahold of the Thermalright Silver Arrow 130mm. I did some late night amazon perusing and actually noticed they had about 6-7 in stock so I went ahead and pulled the trigger on it.

I recall optimum tech or another youtuber having fans on the bottom set as intake to blow against gpu which resulted in a decrease of at least 5c in temps. Either way, I am hoping that between the EVGA XC Ultra shroud/fans, undervolting, and improved v6 ventilation holes, there wont be a need for me to stuff 15 mm slim fans underneath the card.
 

HyperActive

Trash Compacter
Jul 22, 2019
36
11
Thank you guys for the input!

As an alternative to the u9s, a friend recommended I try to get ahold of the Thermalright Silver Arrow 130mm. I did some late night amazon perusing and actually noticed they had about 6-7 in stock so I went ahead and pulled the trigger on it.

I recall optimum tech or another youtuber having fans on the bottom set as intake to blow against gpu which resulted in a decrease of at least 5c in temps. Either way, I am hoping that between the EVGA XC Ultra shroud/fans, undervolting, and improved v6 ventilation holes, there wont be a need for me to stuff 15 mm slim fans underneath the card.
Good luck! :D it's exhaust for the bottom fans though. But it's better you try for yourself, since the v6 changes a lot.
 

titan253

Efficiency Noob
Sep 3, 2019
7
6
Good luck! it's exhaust for the bottom fans though. But it's better you try for yourself, since the v6 changes a lot.
It's very important to note that in that scenario Ali was running an Accelero heatsink that is fanless, if you keep the GPU stock you'd run the bottom fans as intake otherwise you'd be pulling against the GPU fans.
 

HyperActive

Trash Compacter
Jul 22, 2019
36
11
It's very important to note that in that scenario Ali was running an Accelero heatsink that is fanless, if you keep the GPU stock you'd run the bottom fans as intake otherwise you'd be pulling against the GPU fans.
Moofier tested with the rog strix heatsink without fans and best setup was u9s as intake and bottom fans as outtake. You can watch the video Here.
 

EndEffeKt

Average Stuffer
Mar 23, 2019
77
23
In my opinion the 2080ti are way to expensive. I got a used Asus 2080 Turbo for 480 bucks under warranty and will watercool it. Maybe a used 1080ti, 2080 or a 5700xt new are worth considering. Wont play 4k 60hz ultra though.