Feedback needed on plans for first PC build

rudejim

Case Bender
Original poster
Nov 16, 2018
2
0
Never built a PC before but the time has come. Really just looking for a modest gaming rig to play 1080p, 60+ fps. For now I’ll mostly be playing R6 Siege, with a little PUBG and other shooters occasionally. No interest in overclocking or pushing anything too hard. Budget is under $1000 and I already have a monitor.

I don’t have a permanent desk currently so it’ll be tucked away in a closet during the day and pulled out for gaming most nights. Because of that I’ve decided to build in an SG13. Feeling pretty good about the parts I’ve listed below, although cooling is the one thing I’m still questioning. I’ve seen quite a few suggestions about using an AIO, but seeing as I’m new to this in general that makes me a little nervous. Between here, Reddit, and PCPP I’ve seen lots of good examples using air coolers, and based on my plans for it I’m thinking air cooling should be fine, but I’d love any input you all have for me. Thanks in advance!

SG13WB case - $47.00
Ryzen 5 2600 - $159.99
ASRock B450 Gaming ITX/AC - $89.99
Noctua NH-L9a - $39.90
Adata XPG Gammix DDR4-2666 (2 x 8 GB) - $97.99
Samsung 860 Evo 500 GB SSD - $79.99
Sapphire RX 580 8 GB Pulse - $239.99
Seasonic Focus+ 550W Platinum ATX - $69.99
Noctua NF-F12 case fan - $19.50
Hyperx Alloy keyboard - $79.99
Total - $924.33
 

Solo

King of Cable Management
Nov 18, 2017
742
1,234
Take advantage of your motherboard's M.2 slot. Spend the extra money and get a 970 EVO. Don't worry about liquid cooling and stick with the L9a.
 

rudejim

Case Bender
Original poster
Nov 16, 2018
2
0
Take advantage of your motherboard's M.2 slot. Spend the extra money and get a 970 EVO. Don't worry about liquid cooling and stick with the L9a.
Was thinking of that but had seen people say the slot being underneath the board can have thermal issues. Thoughts?
 

Choidebu

"Banned"
Aug 16, 2017
1,182
1,175
It won't be an issue in the fact that most home users won't tax their nvme drives so much to reach worrying temps. Keep in mind 50-60 centigrade is actually optimal temp range for nand chips, as it increases retention rate. Your concern lies in the controller chip which can thermal throttle, but as said previously, most home users won't need to worry.

And if you do tax your drive that much for whatever reason, seeing as your case of choice is steel, adding a thick thermal pad between the drive and the bottom panel will suffice to help dissipate heat from the drive to the case.

Edit: 970 evo is record cheap now - very tempting.