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DAN A4-SFX

Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
What's a good voltage to shoot for when OCing Ryzen? I had a first gen 1600 and that needed 1.37v for 3.7Ghz.

Now I have a 3600 and would like it to sit around 4Ghz if possible.

Voltages I see online vary from 1.1 to 1.4
To be honest, Ryzen 3rd gen actually can go for as high as 1.5V, which is normal. What many people don't realize (and this was also confirmed on an Reddit post I believe) is that the way Ryzen 3000 series work are completely different from other CPUs in terms of voltages.
And that is they do run at high voltages and are supposed to.

Here's a quote from AMD regarding the voltages on Ryzen 3rd gen:

Please note that it is totally normal for your Ryzen to use voltages in a range of 0.200V - 1.500V -- this is the factory operating range of the CPU.
And here you can read the entire post if you'd like:

to be safe you cannot exceed 1.25V !!
that could be applied to other amd cpu.
So what x111 says regarding that you cannot exceed 1.25V isn't proven and the user didn't say either at what frequenzy that 1.25V would run at either?

It also doesn't exactly say anything about this, in their provided link above, that you CAN'T - Only that it can hurt the CPU in the long term by going with voltages above that.

The reason their provided article states that only 6% could achieve that manual overclock is that AMD has already more or less cranked their CPUs to the max with their Ryzen 3000 series. In other words, there's not a whole lot more juice that you can cram out of them than what you get out of the box.

But that is with literally any CPU in history. that the higher voltage you go, the warmer it will run and hence decreases it lifespan. It's one of the long term risks you take with/when overclocking.

Keep in mind though as well, that every CPU is different. You may have a so called "Golden chip", ie you might be able to have a higher frequenzy to a lower voltage than mine. It's just how the silicon works really.

For example, Glob3Tech on Youtube, he managed to get his 3700X stable at 4GHz at 1.075V. Mine couldn't, I needed 1.125V at minimum to run at 4GHz without crashing. So now I'm at 1.130V just to be on the safe side.
 
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swaggywaggy

Trash Compacter
May 3, 2020
54
10
Thanks for the videos @Dawelio

I am now needing to move an m.2 to the back of my motherboard as I'm getting a new, bigger one, to use as a primary drive, which I'll mount to the front.

Do you have any info on if a fan under the Mobo will help with M.2 temps on the back? It'll only be used as a game drive, not a C: drive.
 
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x111

Trash Compacter
Aug 5, 2019
45
2
Thanks for the videos @Dawelio

I am now needing to move an m.2 to the back of my motherboard as I'm getting a new, bigger one, to use as a primary drive, which I'll mount to the front.

Do you have any info on if a fan under the Mobo will help with M.2 temps on the back? It'll only be used as a game drive, not a C: drive.

thermal pad against the case wall helps significantly reduce ssd temperature.
the whole dan a4 case works as a big radiator.


True, but that also results in having a massive heat spot in the middle of the case, which is bad considering how compact the case is overall. Plus that wall is also very close to the GPU, which could cause it to heat up as well.
not quite true because aluminum is very good heat conductor
and anyway it works very well and its the only option we have.

also, it is not quite true about gpu,
in my case, between gpu and and case wall I have riser which wraps with thermal tape and on bottom of the case I have two fans pushing air up.

and do not forget kids,
memory hardware is the most important part of your computer !!

also, from the video we can see how it's important to put extra fan sidewise.

.
 
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Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
Thanks for the videos @Dawelio

I am now needing to move an m.2 to the back of my motherboard as I'm getting a new, bigger one, to use as a primary drive, which I'll mount to the front.

Do you have any info on if a fan under the Mobo will help with M.2 temps on the back? It'll only be used as a game drive, not a C: drive.
Honestly, some people on here do say that a fan does help and that every bit of airflow helps. Which is true in itself, but then again, I don't believe a few degress helps a ton in the Dan A4. Especially since M.2 drives are normally not that warm running overall, unless you do daily heavy loads.

If you look at this video, Glob3Tech actually tested these scenarios with each fan and found out that an fan over the motherboards helps more with VRM temps than a bottom fan. But in the end, you decide for your own PC, I personally don't have one just because I have a V3 and hence don't have the cutout for it.

thermal pad against the case wall helps significantly reduce ssd temperature.
the whole dan a4 case works as a big radiator.
True, but that also results in having a massive heat spot in the middle of the case, which is bad considering how compact the case is overall. Plus that wall is also very close to the GPU, which could cause it to heat up as well.
 

swaggywaggy

Trash Compacter
May 3, 2020
54
10
Honestly, some people on here do say that a fan does help and that every bit of airflow helps. Which is true in itself, but then again, I don't believe a few degress helps a ton in the Dan A4. Especially since M.2 drives are normally not that warm running overall, unless you do daily heavy loads.

If you look at this video, Glob3Tech actually tested these scenarios with each fan and found out that an fan over the motherboards helps more with VRM temps than a bottom fan. But in the end, you decide for your own PC, I personally don't have one just because I have a V3 and hence don't have the cutout for it.



True, but that also results in having a massive heat spot in the middle of the case, which is bad considering how compact the case is overall. Plus that wall is also very close to the GPU, which could cause it to heat up as well.
My VRM are OK as I'm running and air-cooler and I also have a fan on the front M.2 slot. I suppose there's no harm in experimenting with both as I have a spare fan laying around anyway.
 

Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
not quite true because aluminum is very good heat conductor
and anyway it works very well and its the only option we have.

also, it is not quite true about gpu,
in my case, between gpu and and case wall I have riser which wraps with thermal tape and on bottom of the case I have two fans pushing air up.

and do not forget kids,
memory hardware is the most important part of your computer !!

also, from the video we can see how it's important to put extra fan sidewise.
First off, I've asked you in previous posts to quote any posts and reply in a new post. Since looking for your reply in previous posts are a bit of a hassle.
So if you want to reply to my posts in the future and want an reply back, do post a new post and don't simply edit your old one.

________________________________

Now onto answer your reply...

No, it's not the only option we have. There are many options in the A4, just depends on your own personal and specific setup. What components etc you are running inside of it.

I don't really understand what you mean by you have a riser which wraps with thermal tape?... Not sure why you would have that and not sure how good that would be for the riser itself in the long term.

With "memory hardware" I assume you mean storage? As a M.2 drive is an storage device.

My VRM are OK as I'm running and air-cooler and I also have a fan on the front M.2 slot. I suppose there's no harm in experimenting with both as I have a spare fan laying around anyway.
Fair enough then my friend, hope it works out for you and leaves you with better temperatures overall! :)
 

swaggywaggy

Trash Compacter
May 3, 2020
54
10
Had my first proper gaming session since moving from an ATX to the Dan and wow, my Noctua L9A can get loud on full pelt.

It's making me want to refit the AIO but I'm not sure how much quieter it would be using the same slim powerful Noctua fan
 

Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
Had my first proper gaming session since moving from an ATX to the Dan and wow, my Noctua L9A can get loud on full pelt.

It's making me want to refit the AIO but I'm not sure how much quieter it would be using the same slim powerful Noctua fan
Keep in mind that the cooler you have is basically the smallest cooler on the market and your CPU, which I recall is a 9900K if I'm not mistaken, is quite a power hungry and hot running chip. So the fan will ramp up high in order to cool the CPU. And since it's only a 92mm one, it needs to spin fast in order to provide the cooling needed, hence being loud.

I moved onto the 645LT myself and set a solid volt to my 3700X and it became quiet. Sure, in game it ramps up, which is normal. Gotta remember that these are rather limited cooling solutions, which noise is something we have to compromise with these SFF systems unfortunately.

Although, that doesn't mean we can't tweak some things in order to get voltages down, which will lower temperatures, which in turn will lower the overall noise.
It won't be a miracle, but it's something.
 

x111

Trash Compacter
Aug 5, 2019
45
2
Had my first proper gaming session since moving from an ATX to the Dan and wow, my Noctua L9A can get loud on full pelt.

It's making me want to refit the AIO but I'm not sure how much quieter it would be using the same slim powerful Noctua fan
much quieter and way cooler !!
to be on idle of ~50C on cpu package you will hear ~1800RPM on noctua 92mm.
however, your could be higher/lower if you do not use amd 3900x

also, guys do not miss those super extra slim cables !!
with that stuff we can put 92mmx25mm fan under psu on AIO !!

.
 
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Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
also, guys do not miss those super extra slim cables !!
with that stuff we can put 92mmx25mm fan under psu on AIO !!
You can do that with the included cables as well, the user has just turn the AIO upside down. In other words, they are having the AIO tubes go down towards the bottom and then out to the side. Whereas normally the tubes go upwards and then to the motherboard.

Doesn't need those specifically, it all comes down to a user having patience enough to get everything there and cable management. With that said though, having shorter cables does help.

Even the cables I purchased from PSlate customs will do the same job as the link you provided:

 

x111

Trash Compacter
Aug 5, 2019
45
2
You can do that with the included cables as well, the user has just turn the AIO upside down. In other words, they are having the AIO tubes go down towards the bottom and then out to the side. Whereas normally the tubes go upwards and then to the motherboard.

Doesn't need those specifically, it all comes down to a user having patience enough to get everything there and cable management. With that said though, having shorter cables does help.

Even the cables I purchased from PSlate customs will do the same job as the link you provided:

what are you taking about, there is literally no room for that !!
look again on my build !!
;)

.
 

Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
what are you taking about, there is literally no room for that !!
look again on my build !!
;)
There is, it's just extremely tight. But you would be able to cram everything in there, if you're willing to.

Is that your build? Since the user is "LoserCard", which is also a member of this forum and the grammar you're both using in your posts are different.
And hence, I doubt it's your build.
 

Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
Oh, my bad then... Do you have the CPU at auto in BIOS? If setting your CPU to a locked frequenzy, ie 4GHz @ ~1.1V, it may not be that loud or as loud during gaming. This is due to you have lowered the voltage quite a bit and hence the CPU doesn't get as hot and therefore the cooler doesn't need to run that fast.

I'd still recommend the 645LT though, since it will give you better temperatures overall.
 

swaggywaggy

Trash Compacter
May 3, 2020
54
10
Oh, my bad then... Do you have the CPU at auto in BIOS? If setting your CPU to a locked frequenzy, ie 4GHz @ ~1.1V, it may not be that loud or as loud during gaming. This is due to you have lowered the voltage quite a bit and hence the CPU doesn't get as hot and therefore the cooler doesn't need to run that fast.

I'd still recommend the 645LT though, since it will give you better temperatures overall.
Yeah I have it set to auto with an ever so slight negative voltage offset. When I get the time I'll dive into setting it at an all core overclock and see how that does.

Glob3Tech's latest video gives a really good view of the PSlates

 
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Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
Yeah I have it set to auto with an ever so slight negative voltage offset. When I get the time I'll dive into setting it at an all core overclock and see how that does.

Glob3Tech's latest video gives a really good view of the PSlates

Yeah it is the auto that makes it spin up and down. If you have a set clock and voltage, so it doesn't fluctuate, it will become quiet.
I did this to mine (3700X) and it helped so much with the noise.
 

x111

Trash Compacter
Aug 5, 2019
45
2
There is, it's just extremely tight. But you would be able to cram everything in there, if you're willing to.

Is that your build? Since the user is "LoserCard", which is also a member of this forum and the grammar you're both using in your posts are different.
And hence, I doubt it's your build.
There is, it's just extremely tight. But you would be able to cram everything in there, if you're willing to.

Is that your build? Since the user is "LoserCard", which is also a member of this forum and the grammar you're both using in your posts are different.
And hence, I doubt it's your build.

what the heck are you talking about again :)
check my build in my signature.
or just go follow this link

and because of the corsair huge plastic connectors there is zero extra room under the psu.

I had barely squeezed 92mmx15mm fan.

.
 

Dawelio

Awesomeness
Moderator
Dec 17, 2017
224
106
what the heck are you talking about again :)
check my build in my signature.
or just go follow this link

and because of the corsair huge plastic connectors there is zero extra room under the psu.

I had barely squeezed 92mmx15mm fan.
What I am talking about is the post you posted previously, which I have added/quoted below.

When you said "look again on my build !!", I thought you were referring to the build you had linked earlier, which is why I said I doubt it's yours.

I didn't understand that you actually meant your own build, which is linked in your signature.

much quieter and way cooler !!
to be on idle of ~50C on cpu package you will hear ~1800RPM on noctua 92mm.
however, your could be higher/lower if you do not use amd 3900x

also, guys do not miss those super extra slim cables !!
with that stuff we can put 92mmx25mm fan under psu on AIO !!
 

swaggywaggy

Trash Compacter
May 3, 2020
54
10
I'm looking for a USB adaptor so I can connect the USB C front panel to my Aorus X570 which only has the older USB 3.0 style front panel connector.

I see the adaptor that is listed on the DAN website and that's around €8

I am from the UK so I was looking for something from here and found this on OCUK. I am completely lost why this also has a USB 2.0 plug?

 

PseudoPsyche

Cable Smoosher
New User
Jul 10, 2019
9
3
I think LINKUP add this because this was my result of the sample test: "Not recommended for ITX or Mini-ITX cases as the temperature for Mini-ITX may be too high, the performance may fall back to PCIE 3.0 at this high temperature. "

They told me the problem is solved and they will send me a new sample.
Any update on this? I'm thinking of ordering the LINKUP riser, but won't if this may still cause issues.