Chopin build questions

LeDelmo

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Sep 6, 2018
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The advantage of nvme ssd vs (m2 or not) sata ssd lies in copying big files. This is an oversimplification but I think is enough for you to make a decision.

Boot time can be divided into two part: hardware/bios POST, OS boot.

BIOS POST won't be affected whether you have nvme or not. It does fluctuate if you have a lot of devices connected.

OS (hard) boot is never big files operation. It is always lots of small files loaded and executed etc. Soft boot (e.g. suspend to disk) is another story - this is just an educated guess, I might be wrong - could possibly be big image file loadout operation to ram.

So I'd say not much difference going nvme to decrease boot time against sata ssd. Even desktop programs might not see much improvement. But games which copies big resource files, media creation/editing, might see more.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking.

I'll probably just get a normal 2.5" SATA SSD. As the motherboard I am going with only has a rear M.2 slot and I have read it will overheat in this case. I am still unsure if a thermal pad would help dissipate the heat ether and don't want to take the chance it not working out.

If I need faster storage I plan on getting that SilverStone ECM23 at a later date.
 

Thehack

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Yeah, that's what I was thinking.

I'll probably just get a normal 2.5" SATA SSD. As the motherboard I am going with only has a rear M.2 slot and I have read it will overheat in this case. I am still unsure if a thermal pad would help dissipate the heat ether and don't want to take the chance it not working out.

If I need faster storage I plan on getting that SilverStone ECM23 at a later date.

You'll be fine. People are way too paranoid.

It overheats if you're pushing it. Most people use their pc to browse or do light work, not run big calculations and moving lots of dataset.

You can also just get a regular sata if you're still paranoid since sata doesn't encounter the throttle issues.

Here is what puget said about throttling:
https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/a...erformance-Thermal-Throttling-868/#Conclusion

You essentially will have to move over 300 GB sequentially for it to throttle, and that is for the previous 960 pro gen.

This is quite an annoying myth that is often perpetuated.
 
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LeDelmo

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I have a quick question. For the most part are all Ram sticks comparable with AMD? I ask because I just noticed some G.Skill sticks on Newegg say AMD on them.

And I went to G.Skills website to check the compatibility for the set I might order. And it looks to only show Intel board support.
https://www.gskill.com/en/product/f4-3200c16d-16gtzkw

So would there be any risk in getting a set of Ram that doesn't necessarily say its AMD compatible?
 

rfarmer

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Jul 7, 2017
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I have a quick question. For the most part are all Ram sticks comparable with AMD? I ask because I just noticed some G.Skill sticks on Newegg say AMD on them.

And I went to G.Skills website to check the compatibility for the set I might order. And it looks to only show Intel board support.
https://www.gskill.com/en/product/f4-3200c16d-16gtzkw

So would there be any risk in getting a set of Ram that doesn't necessarily say its AMD compatible?

AMD in particular can be very picky about the type of ram used, although it is better now then when Ryzen was first released. Your best bet is still to go to the motherboard manufacturers site and check the memory support list.
 

LeDelmo

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I checked Asrocks site and they only show two that support 3066. But, I have seen people run 3200.
Asus's site shows a few 3200 but not the one I am looking at, 16GTZKW.

Considering the Ram is the single most important and expensive aspect of the build I wish it were a little more confidence inspiring.
 

LeDelmo

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Okay now this is hilarious. The Team Group Xtreem 3600 8Gb 18-20-20-39 is the only set of memory that officially says its compatible with the Asrock B450i and AMD.

It also is one of my favorite sticks as far as looks go. Only thing, the flipping things are still $190! Where as G.Skill is only $140.
Still crossing my fingers for a Black Friday sale with TeamGroup... But, the closer it gets the less and less likely it appears to be.

G.Skill on the other hand has already been getting huge mark downs. Great time to get a set of TridentZ RGB.
 

rfarmer

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Here are some builds on pcpartspicker that use Asrock B450i. 3 of them are using G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200, there is one using Trident Z 3000. A few using Corsair Vengeance 3000 and 3200.
 

LeDelmo

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Hey, So I got everything except a Boot-Drive and am trying to decide between a $53 480Gb 2.5" SSD and a $80 250Gb M.2 NVMe SSD.

This will have to be used as a boot-drive for the foreseeable future. As even if I upgrade later I doubt I will want to bother transferring my OS to a different drive. Just seems like more hassle than I want to deal with.

Would really appreciate some input and am open to suggestions as-well.

Thanks again for all the guys everybody. The finish line is finally coming into sight.
 

LeDelmo

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Ordered the the last part I needed. Got the Adata XPG SX8200 240Gb NVMe M.2 drive to use as the boot-drive. I know its not much memory but for now I think it will be okay and I can always add additional memory later. Whats most important is that it fell perfectly into my budget and I don't consider this compromising for inferior components to meet budget.

At $50 I feel like it was a great bargain. (Newegg sale) And it should offer zippy boot-ups. I greatly prefer the fact the M.2 doesn't need any cabling. And I plan on adding a adapter to the PCIe Express slot to be able to add another one or two (If it fits) at a later date.

Honestly, Just about everything I got is crazy over-kill considering I will only be running the 2200G. But, they are all quality components that I could transfer to something more serious down the road even if I would need to.

BTW the whole build is just at $482 if you don't count tax. And I still need a Windows 10 Key.

$99 in-Win Chopin Case (150W PSU included)
$89 Asrock B450i Motherboard
$89 AMD 2200G
$130 Corsair Dominator Platinum 16Gb Ram
$25 Id-Cooling IS-40x CPU cooler
$50 Adata XPG SX8200 240Gb NVMe M.2 Storage drive

Though, if I only went for the 8Gb Ram set and used the stock cooler I would have saved $75.
 

LeDelmo

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Help!

Finished the build but it wont boot!

GOT IT!

Man I was sweating bullets there for a sec.

Turns out a wire was keeping the main harness from being all the way plugged in. Fixed it. Boot's up just fine. Installed Windows 10. Tried XMP 3200. But it wouldn't boot. So, I backed off to 3000mhz.. I'll finish tuning it later this week. Need to pick a wireless keyboard and mouse.

So happy its running though.
 
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Shield_RO

Case Bender
Dec 14, 2019
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Hello ITX people

I intend to go smaller from a classical, all-around mini itx case (Raijintek Metis Plus), to a smaller itx pc, with a portable monitor.

It looks that for the Ryzen 3400G the best case (value for the money), after many searches, remains In Win Chopin. I am not a big fan of Chopin design but it has the features I need: good cooling for the CPU, mounting space for 1 SSD + 1 HDD, and a relatively reliable power source. Please feel free to advise if there are other cases you know with the same or almost the same features. Also, an expensive piece of shiny aluminum is not on my list.

The thing I don't like the most are those cables. Too long for the case. I am thinking that an option can be to cut the extra length.
Is there a risk, have you tried this? What do you need for the process?

Another ITX person :)
 

creature.shock

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Dec 16, 2019
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The thing I don't like the most are those cables. Too long for the case. I am thinking that an option can be to cut the extra length.
Is there a risk, have you tried this? What do you need for the process?

Another ITX person :)

One of the things I did with my Chopin build was to completely take it apart and reroute as many of the cables as possible around the back of the case. You can easily take the metal and plastic front off and pull many of the cables like the ATX 12V round and bring it down from the top. I also pulled the majority of USB 3.1 header cable back and around back as well. That opened up a lot of space inside the case.

I also recommend one of the low profile coolers, I'm a fan of Noctua's coolers. I use a NH-L9a-AM4 and it keeps the APU 55C at most. I know others have had really good luck with Cryorig coolers as well. Another thing I recommend is getting a NF-A4x10 FLX 12V fan and replacing the one in the PSU with it. The one that comes in the PSU really sucks.