Asus ROG Strix X570-i + AMD 3700X in an S4M

Alfaifi

Minimal Tinkerer
Original poster
May 15, 2019
4
5
Hi everyone ..

Big news today from AMD and Asus
I wonder how the new Ryzen 7 3700X (65 TDP 😍) and the new Asus X570-i motherboard will perform in an S4M.
Not a lot of information on the NAVI GPUs or the rest of the Zen 2 line, I think we'll have to wait for their next event on June 10th

Anyway, for our beloved S4M, I have small concerns on the I/O Shield on the Asus X570 board, not sure that would fit the S4M !!








 
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Kmpkt

Innovation through Miniaturization
KMPKT
Bronze Supporter
Feb 1, 2016
3,299
5,699
Already posted this in another thread, but it seems more appropriate here. Where is airflow going to end up going here? There's already been significant heatsink compatibility issues with the current RoG Strix boards if I'm not mistaken due to massive RoG heatsinks. F'ing awful design here ASUS (you bunch of logo whores).

Putting this thing in a < 10L SFF case, the I/O is pretty much going block any reasonable airflow in two directions. In the case of a downdraft cooler you're going to get a massive pocket of hot air around your cooler which will likely kill the Delta-T in your fin stack. Even putting a smaller tower cooler on this board (ie. NH-D9L) is going to be like cutting the legs off a racehorse as you'll likely be blocking the airflow from the bottom part of your impeller considerably. Guess it's time to buy a 150 dollar AIO cooler from ASUS.

All behold the Great Wall of Taiwan, the only I/O shield and daughterboard combo visible from space!
 

Alfaifi

Minimal Tinkerer
Original poster
May 15, 2019
4
5
Lol really what is the point of creating a mini ITX if they are going to fill it with huge gadgets like that!!!

Guess we'll have to wait for other manufacturers merch.

This one is a no go in the S4M :(
 

AltPlusF4

Case Bender
Apr 8, 2019
2
0
The 3700x looks awesome for SFF builds. 65w and 9700k like performance? Hopefully that is the case.

I'm waiting to see what Asrock has. They usually have good ITX boards.
 

Alfaifi

Minimal Tinkerer
Original poster
May 15, 2019
4
5
We have one ITX MB from asrock, sadly they managed to do even worse than Asus with the HUGE I/O !!!!!

Not sure that would fit S4M :(





 

dnpp123

What's an ITX?
Jun 6, 2019
1
0
What do you guys think of the https://www.anandtech.com/show/14460/gigabyte-unveils-x570-miniitx-motherboard-x570-i-aorus-pro-wifi ?

Still look thicck but a tad more profiled. Would the air flow be better you think?

Also, what's the max TDP you can have for the CPU? Do you guys think those 105W CPUs would be fine? I saw builds with a 95TDP... Having 24 threads running in such a small box would be mad nice. Even more 32 if the TDP comes the same. No AIO cooler would be better... Looking more at the case it seems we can add 2 extra fans if we make more holes in it (anyone has a source/link?), would this help?


Also for the graphics, do you guys think a PCIe 3 riser is the same as a PCIe 4 riser? Looking at the PCIe specs it seems to be, just the frequency is higher, but wonder what do you guys think? I know the gpu bandwidth doesn't need PCIe4 but still. Hoping there is some nice navi GPU smaller than 215mm coming...
 
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R.Heart

Minimal Tinkerer
Jun 19, 2019
4
0
dnpp123, from what I can tell just by looking, I'd be willing to bet that board works good. And the extra fan by the PCI connector is a nice bonus. But please don't take my word for it, I only just put in a pre-order on the next batch for a S4.
The max TDP for the L9i/a, as far as I have read, is 84w, and this is currently the best performer for the S4 according to Josh's analysis. So I guess it just depends what you are doing. If gaming is your main thing, you "technically" don't need more than 4 cores, or 6 without hyperthreading. If you want to use a beast like the 9900K or upcoming 3950X, undervolting, and even underclocking will likely be mandatory. The reason you see those higher TDP CPU's is because only the K-scu models allow for making the necessary adjustments-- specifically on Intel processors. You might have heard Josh mention how some builders were able to get underneath 50w TDP, which is impressive. This is just based on my limited understanding. But hey if you're into it "just because," absolutely go for it.

*AFAIK* PCIe 4 is 100% backwards compatible-- on the motherboard. Expansion cards using PCIe 4 will not be compatible with a PCIe 3 slot. *AFAIK* I suspect the connector will be a little longer physically, but it's strictly throughput, there's no computation being done here. You will not gain any performance benefits using a standard desktop graphics card UNLESS you are getting up to like, dual 2080's and beyond. But theoretically you wouldn't even need any kind of bridge for it. Thing is, that isn't really the main benefit to the new standard, what I'm seeing says it will mainly benefit PCI slotted hard drives, as currently NVMe borrows some lanes for it, and even robs performance if you hook up a second one. Again, not even useful for gaming at present, because you don't even bottleneck on a SATA interface SSD.

But yeah, it's a super exciting time to be a PC builder. :)
 
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R.Heart

Minimal Tinkerer
Jun 19, 2019
4
0
Already posted this in another thread, but it seems more appropriate here. Where is airflow going to end up going here? There's already been significant heatsink compatibility issues with the current RoG Strix boards if I'm not mistaken due to massive RoG heatsinks. F'ing awful design here ASUS (you bunch of logo whores).

Putting this thing in a < 10L SFF case, the I/O is pretty much going block any reasonable airflow in two directions. In the case of a downdraft cooler you're going to get a massive pocket of hot air around your cooler which will likely kill the Delta-T in your fin stack. Even putting a smaller tower cooler on this board (ie. NH-D9L) is going to be like cutting the legs off a racehorse as you'll likely be blocking the airflow from the bottom part of your impeller considerably. Guess it's time to buy a 150 dollar AIO cooler from ASUS.

All behold the Great Wall of Taiwan, the only I/O shield and daughterboard combo visible from space!
lmao that thing is obnoxious! But it makes for a cool show piece. Have you seen Bitwit's all Asus ROG build? It's nice but OMG bright lights everywhere.
 
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Valantar

Master of Cramming
Jan 20, 2018
485
303
*AFAIK* PCIe 4 is 100% backwards compatible-- on the motherboard. Expansion cards using PCIe 4 will not be compatible with a PCIe 3 slot. *AFAIK* I suspect the connector will be a little longer physically, but it's strictly throughput, there's no computation being done here. You will not gain any performance benefits using a standard desktop graphics card UNLESS you are getting up to like, dual 2080's and beyond. But theoretically you wouldn't even need any kind of bridge for it. Thing is, that isn't really the main benefit to the new standard, what I'm seeing says it will mainly benefit PCI slotted hard drives, as currently NVMe borrows some lanes for it, and even robs performance if you hook up a second one. Again, not even useful for gaming at present, because you don't even bottleneck on a SATA interface SSD.

But yeah, it's a super exciting time to be a PC builder. :)
As with all generations of PCIe, 4.0 is entirely (pysically and electrically) backwards-compatible with 3.0, 2.0 and 1.0. A PCIe 4.0-based GPU such as the Radeon VII or upcoming RX 5700 series will plug into any old PCIe board and work just fine (barring other incompatibilities such as UEFI issues). The controllers just step down to a compatibility mode. If compatibility only went one way, that would mean that GPUs, for example, wouldn't adopt the new tech until the vast majority of the potential buyers had PCIe 4.0, which likely won't be the case for another 5 years. In other words, limiting backwards compatibility would kill the standard before it even launched. Even the newly presented proposal for PCIe 6.0 maintains full backwards compatibility to 1.0.
 

R.Heart

Minimal Tinkerer
Jun 19, 2019
4
0
As with all generations of PCIe, 4.0 is entirely (pysically and electrically) backwards-compatible with 3.0, 2.0 and 1.0. A PCIe 4.0-based GPU such as the Radeon VII or upcoming RX 5700 series will plug into any old PCIe board and work just fine (barring other incompatibilities such as UEFI issues). The controllers just step down to a compatibility mode. If compatibility only went one way, that would mean that GPUs, for example, wouldn't adopt the new tech until the vast majority of the potential buyers had PCIe 4.0, which likely won't be the case for another 5 years. In other words, limiting backwards compatibility would kill the standard before it even launched. Even the newly presented proposal for PCIe 6.0 maintains full backwards compatibility to 1.0.
.......Yes. Thank you. 8)